One in Messiah Congregation

Debunking of a few false doctrines

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Watch out for the mother goddess doctrine

 

Catholic Bible - 1899 Douay-Rheims

 

***Bad Catholic translation - 1899 Douay-Rheims - Gen 3:15 I will put enmities between thee and the woman, and thy seed and her seed: she shall cursh thy head, and thou shalt lie in wait for her heel.

 

she shall (wrong)

her heel (wrong)

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KJV - Gen.3 [15] And I (God) will put enmity between thee (satan) and the woman, and between thy (satan's) seed and her seed; it (he or God) shall bruise thy (satan's) head,( fatal blow to satan's head) and thou (satan) shalt bruise his heel (Messiah would have to die on a tree).

, , , : ,

it shall (right)

his heel (right)

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- hoo = he or it - The scripture uses "hoo" in Gen. 3:15

- hee = she or it

heel - / noun masculine - (his, he)

H6119

/

‛âqêb / ‛iqqebâh

BDB Definition:

1) heel, rear, footprint, hinder part, hoof, rear of a troop, footstep

1a) heel

1b) mark of heel, footprint

1c) hinder part, rear

Part of Speech: noun masculine

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Next false doctrine to debunk

Only 2 people in the beginning

"no female Lilith or male Lilis in the beginning"

Watchout for Legends, bad Concordances, bibles and the Talmud

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Gen.1 [27] So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.(2)

Gen.2 [7] And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

[21] And the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam and he slept: and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof;
[22] And the rib, which the LORD God had taken from man, made he a woman, and brought her unto the man.
[23] And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.
[24] Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.
[25] And they were both naked, (2) the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.

Gen.5 [1] This is the book of the generations of Adam. In the day that God created man, in the likeness of God made he him;

Matt.19 [5] And said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain shall be one flesh? [6] Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder.

 

G1417 δύο duo doo'-o - A primary numeral; two: - both, twain, two.

 

Thayer Definition:

1) the two, the twain

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Here is the verse:

 

-, - ; - ,

Isa. 34 [14] The wild beasts of the desert shall also meet with the wild beasts of the island, and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; the screech owl also shall rest there, and find for herself a place of rest.

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H3917

lîylîyth

lee-leeth'

From H3915; a night spectre: - screech owl.

 

BDB Definition:

1) Lilith, name of a female goddess known as a night demon who haunts the desolate places of Edom

1a) might be a nocturnal animal that inhabits desolate places

Part of Speech: noun feminine

 

owl, 1

Isa_34:13-14 (2)

screech, 1

Isa_34:14 (2)

 

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H3915

layil lêyl layelâh

lah'-yil, lale, lah'-yel-aw

From the same as H3883; properly a twist (away of the light), that is, night; figuratively adversity: - ([mid-]) night (season).

 

BDB Definition:

1) night

1a) night (as opposed to day)

1b) of gloom, protective shadow (figuratively)

Part of Speech: noun masculine

 

night, 210

Gen_1:5, Gen_1:14, Gen_1:16, Gen_1:18, Gen_8:22, Gen_14:15, Gen_19:5, Gen_19:33-35 (3), Gen_20:3, Gen_26:24, Gen_30:15-16 (2), Gen_31:24, Gen_31:39-40 (2), Gen_32:13, Gen_32:21-22 (2), Gen_40:5, Gen_41:11, Gen_46:2, Exo_10:13, Exo_12:8, Exo_12:12, Exo_12:30-31 (2), Exo_12:42 (2), Exo_13:21-22 (3), Exo_14:20-21 (3), Exo_40:38, Lev_6:9, Lev_8:35, Num_9:16, Num_9:21, Num_11:9, Num_11:32, Num_14:1, Num_14:14, Num_22:8, Num_22:19-20 (2), Deu_1:33, Deu_16:1, Deu_23:10, Deu_28:66, Jos_1:8, Jos_8:2-3 (3), Jos_8:9, Jos_8:13, Jos_10:9, Jdg_6:25, Jdg_6:27, Jdg_6:40, Jdg_7:9, Jdg_9:32, Jdg_9:34, Jdg_16:2 (2), Jdg_19:25, Jdg_20:5, Rth_1:12, Rth_3:2, Rth_3:13, 1Sa_14:34, 1Sa_14:36, 1Sa_15:11, 1Sa_15:16, 1Sa_19:10-11 (2), 1Sa_19:24, 1Sa_25:16, 1Sa_28:7-8 (2), 1Sa_28:20, 1Sa_28:25, 1Sa_31:12, 2Sa_2:29, 2Sa_2:32, 2Sa_4:7, 2Sa_7:4, 2Sa_17:1, 2Sa_17:16, 2Sa_19:7, 2Sa_21:10, 1Ki_3:5, 1Ki_3:19, 1Ki_8:29, 1Ki_8:59, 2Ki_6:14, 2Ki_7:12, 2Ki_8:21, 2Ki_19:35, 2Ki_25:4, 1Ch_9:33, 1Ch_17:3, 2Ch_1:7, 2Ch_6:20, 2Ch_7:12, 2Ch_21:9, 2Ch_35:14, Neh_1:6, Neh_2:12-13 (2), Neh_2:15, Neh_4:9, Neh_4:22, Neh_6:10, Neh_9:12, Neh_9:19, Est_4:16, Est_6:1, Job_3:3, Job_3:6-7 (2), Job_5:13-14 (2), Job_17:12, Job_20:8, Job_24:14, Job_27:20, Job_30:17, Job_33:15, Job_34:25, Job_35:10, Job_36:20, Psa_1:2, Psa_16:6-7 (2), Psa_17:3, Psa_22:2 (3), Psa_32:4, Psa_42:3, Psa_42:8, Psa_55:10, Psa_74:16, Psa_77:2, Psa_77:6, Psa_78:14, Psa_88:1, Psa_91:4-5 (2), Psa_92:2, Psa_104:20, Psa_105:39, Psa_119:55, Psa_121:6, Psa_134:1, Psa_136:9, Psa_139:11-12 (2), Pro_7:9, Pro_31:15, Pro_31:18, Ecc_2:23, Ecc_8:16, Son_3:1, Son_3:8, Son_5:2, Isa_4:5, Isa_15:1 (2), Isa_16:3, Isa_21:11-12 (3), Isa_26:9, Isa_27:3, Isa_28:19, Isa_29:7, Isa_30:29, Isa_34:10, Isa_38:12-13 (2), Isa_60:11, Isa_62:6, Jer_6:5, Jer_9:1, Jer_14:17, Jer_16:13, Jer_31:35, Jer_33:20 (2), Jer_33:25, Jer_36:30, Jer_39:4, Jer_49:9, Jer_52:7, Lam_1:2, Lam_2:18-19 (2), Hos_7:5-6 (2), Amo_5:8, Oba_1:5, Jon_4:10 (2), Mic_3:6, Zec_1:8, Zec_14:7

nights, 15

Gen_7:4, Gen_7:12, Exo_24:18, Exo_34:28, Deu_9:9, Deu_9:11, Deu_9:18, Deu_9:25, Deu_10:10, 1Sa_30:12, 1Ki_19:8, Job_2:13, Job_7:3, Isa_21:8, Jon_1:17

midnight, 8

Exo_11:4, Exo_12:29, Jdg_16:3 (2), Rth_3:8, 1Ki_3:20, Job_34:20, Psa_119:62

 

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Here is the misuse of the verse in some legends:

 

Also watchout for bad Concordances and Bibles

 

The crux of the matter of this myth is always found in the wrong bible version.

 

Isaiah 34:14, NRSV reads, "there too Lilith shall repose

 

KLV - Isa.34 [14] The wild beasts of the desert shall also meet with the wild beasts of the island, and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; the screech owl also shall rest there, and find for herself a place of rest.

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H3917 - lîylîyth - lee-leeth' - From H3915; a night spectre: - screech owl.

 

lîylîyth - noun common feminine singular absolute

 

B4891 lîylîyth (page 539) (Strong 3917)

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Legends

 

Lilith (Milton Che night-hag), name of a female night-demon haunting desolate Edom; prob. borrowed fr. Bab., Is 34:14 on the development of legends of Lilith in later Judaism, v. Bux:Lex. Talmud., s.v. Che:ad loc. Grünbaum:ZMG xxxi.1877, 250 f. Connexion with hlyl perhaps only apparent, a popular etymology).

 

A female goddess known as a night demon who haunts the desolate places of Edom (Isa 34:14). The ruin of Edom is so complete that only wildcats, satyrs, and Lilith will stay there.

 

In late rabbinic literature, she is depicted as a creature with wings and long, flowing hair. No doubt she personifies the night or sunset.

 

In Ugaritic literature she receives sacrifices (UT 23:7) and is invoked in a hymn (UT 104) which calls her "the veiled bride" ( klmk [ ktmt ]) and "our lady" ( bltn). The former epithet she shares with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar.

 

The ancient Canaanite city-state of Ugarit is of utmost importance for those who study the Old Testament. The literature of the city and the theology contained therein go a very long way in helping us to understand the meaning of various Biblical passages as well as aiding us in deciphering difficult Hebrew words. Ugarit was at its political, religious and economic height around the 12th century BCE and thus its period of greatness corresponds with the entry of Israel into Canaan.

Why should people interested in the Old Testament want to know about this city and its inhabitants? Simply because when we listen to their voices we hear echoes of the Old Testament itself. Several of the Psalms were simply adapted from Ugaritic sources; the story of the flood has a near mirror image in Ugaritic literature; and the language of the Bible is greatly illuminated by the language of Ugarit. For instance, look at M. Dahoods brilliant commentary on the Psalms in the Anchor Bible series for the necessity of Ugaritic for accurate Biblical exegesis. (N.B., for a more thorough discussion of the language of Ugarit, the student is advised to take the course titled Ugaritic Grammar offered by this institution).

In short, when one has well in hand the literature and theology of Ugarit, one is well on the way to being able to comprehend some of the moststament. For this reason it is worthwhile that we pursue this topic.

2. The Discovery of Ugarit and the Ugaritic Texts.

In 1928 a group of French archaeologists journeyed with 7 camels, one donkey, and some burden bearers towards the tel known as Ras Shamra. After a week at the site they discovered a cemetery 150 meters from the Mediterranean Sea. In the graves they discovered Egyptian and Phoenician artwork and alabaster. They also found some Mycenean and Cypriot materials.

After the discovery of the cemetery they found a city and a royal palace about 1000 meters from the sea on a tel 18 meters high. The tel was called by the locals Ras Shamra which means fennel hill. There also Egyptian artifacts were discovered and dated to the 2nd millennium BCE.

The greatest discovery made at the site was a collection of tablets carved with (a then) unknown cuneiform script. In 1932 the identification of the site was made when some of the tablets were deciphered; the city was the ancient and famous site of Ugarit.

Ugarit experienced a very long history. A city was built on the site in the Neolithic period around 6000 BCE. The oldest written evidence of the city is found in some texts from the nearby city of Ebla written around 1800 BCE. At that time both Ebla and Ugarit were under Egyptian hegemony, which shows that the long arm of Egypt extended all along the west coast of the Mediterranean Sea (for Ugarit is located in modern day Syria roughly dead east of the NE coast of Cyprus on the coast of Syria). The population of Ugarit at that time was roughly 7635 people. The city of Ugarit continued to be dominated by the Egyptians through 1400 BCE.

All of the tablets found at Ugarit were written in the last period of its life (around 1300- 1200 BCE). The kings of this last and greatest period were:

 

Actually, these night spirits are to be correlated with the male Lilis. This masculine form covers both male and female genders, as explicitly stated in one of the many references contained in the Aramaic Magical Bowls (see Cyrus H. Gordon, Archiv, Orientali, 6:322). She appears as La-le in Linear A and as lly in a Phoenician incantation from Arslan Tash. Isaiah in his reference does not encourage worship or respect for this demonic deity. The name may be used symbolically to depict a desolation. (Cf. KJV "screech owl.")

 

Is it not possible also that what was a night demon in the pagan culture was just a night creature (SO NIV), perhaps a bat or owl, in Israel? The pagan with his animism fills realities with spirits. Cf. Hebrew reshep "pestilence" with Ugaritic rshp the "god of pestilence" and Hebrew ym "sea" with Ugaritic the "god who is Prince Sea." So lîlît might have been a real creature demonized in the surrounding culture.

 

Bibliography: Leuillet, Rend and Xavier Leon-Dufour, "Night," in DBT, pp. 346-47. For a picture of Lilith, see Henry Frankfort, Art and Architecture of the Ancient Orient, 1958, pl. 56, p. 56. W.C.K.

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Watchout for bad Concordances and Bibles

BDB Definition:

1) Lilith, name of a female goddess known as a night demon who haunts the desolate places of Edom

1a) might be a nocturnal animal that inhabits desolate places

Part of Speech: noun feminine

 

Isa 34:14 The wild beasts of the desert shall also meet with the wild beasts of the islands,.... In Rome, and take up their abode there; of these creatures, the first of which the Targum renders monstrous ones, and the latter wild cats; see Gill on Isa_13:22,

 

and the satyr shall cry to his fellow; or the "hairy" one (r); from which word the goat has its name; and these creatures are described by the ancients as half goats and half men; of which See Gill on Isa_13:21. The Targum renders it demons; and with this well agrees the account of Babylon or Rome as fallen, that it shall be the habitation of, devils, and the hold of every foul spirit, Rev_18:2,

 

the screech owl also shall rest there, and find for herself a place of rest; there being no inhabitants to disturb her.

By the name "Lilith", it appears to be a night bird, which flies and is heard in the night.

 

The Jews call a she demon by this name, which, they say (s), has a human face, and has wings, and destroys children as soon as born; and therefore the Jews, especially in Germany, write upon the four corners of the bed of a new mother, Adam, Eve, out Lilith (t); the same with the Lamia of the Romans; and so the Vulgate Latin here renders it.

 

(r) "pilosus", a "capillus." (s) T. Bab. Nidda, fol. 24. 2. (t) Vid. Buxtorf. Lex. Rab. col. 1140.

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Question: "Who was Lilith / Lillith? Does the Bible say anything about Adam having another wife before Eve?"

Answer:
There are legends that Adam had a wife before Eve who was named Lilith, but this is not found in the Bible. The legends vary significantly, but they all essentially agree that Lilith left Adam because she did not want to submit to him. According to the legends, Lilith was an evil, wicked woman who committed adultery with Satan and produced a race of evil creatures. None of this is true. There is no biblical basis whatsoever for these concepts. There is no one in the Bible named Lilith.

The passage most often pointed to as evidence for Lilith is Isaiah 34:14, which in the NRSV reads, "there too Lilith shall repose." This is a poor translation. Every other major translation of the Bible reads something to the effect of "night creature" or "screech owl." Even if "demon monster named Lilith" was the proper translation of the Hebrew word, Adam is nowhere even hinted at in this passage or its context. Whatever the Lilith was, it is not given any connection whatsoever to Adam or Creation.

Another commonly used support for Lilith is the differing Creation accounts in Genesis chapters 1-2. Some claim that the woman in Genesis 1 was Lilith, with the woman in Genesis 2 being Eve. This is completely ludicrous. Rather, Genesis chapter 2 is a "closer look" at the creation of Adam and Eve as recorded in Genesis chapter 1. The Bible specifically says that Adam and Eve were the first human beings ever created (Genesis 1:26-28; 2:18-25). This "Lilith" myth is popular in some radical feminist movements because Lilith is an example of a woman refusing to submit to male headship. While there are myths outside of the Word of God regarding Lilith, her complete absence from Scripture demonstrates that she is nothing more than a myth.

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Lilith (Hebrew ) is a mythological female Mesopotamian storm demon associated with wind and was thought to be a bearer of disease, illness, and death. The figure of Lilith first appeared in a class of wind and storm demons or spirits as Lilitu, in Sumer, circa 4000 BC. Many scholars place the origin of the phonetic name "Lilith" at somewhere around 700 BC despite post-dating even the time of Moses.[1] Lilith appears as a night demon in Jewish lore and as a screech owl in the King James version of the Bible.

 

The Myth of Lilith

According to Jewish folklore, Lilith was the first wife of Adam. She was banished from the Garden of Eden when she refused to make herself subservient to Adam (specifically, she refused to get into the missionary position with him during sex). When she was cast out, she was made into a demon figure, and Adam was given a second wife, Eve, who was fashioned from his rib to ensure her obedience to her man. The following is an excerpt from a Jewish folktale that describes some of the evils attributed to Lilith:

"The wife brought the mirror and all of the fine furnishings in the cellar to her own home and proudly displayed it. She hung the mirror in the room of their daughter, who was a dark-haired coquette. The girl glanced at herself in the mirror all the time, and in this way she was drawn into Lilith's web.... For that mirror had hung in the the den of demons, and a daughter of Lilith had made her home there. And when the mirror was taken from the haunted house, the demoness came with it. For every mirror is a gateway to the Other World and leads directly to Lilith's cave. That is the cave Lilith went to when she abandoned Adam and the Garden of Eden for all time, the cave where she sported with her demon lovers. From these unions multitudes of demons were born, who flocked from that cave and infiltrated the world. And when they want to return, they simply enter the nearest mirror. That is why it is said that Lilith makes her home in every mirror...

"Now the daughter of Lilith who made her home in that mirror watched every movement of the girl who posed before it. She bided her time and one day she slipped out of the mirror and took possession of the girl, entering through her eyes. In this way she took control of her, stirring her desire at will.... So it happened that this young girl, driven by the evil wishes of Lilith's daughter, ran around with young men who lived in the same neighborhood."

From "Lilith's Cave," Lilith's Cave: Jewish tales of the supernatural, edited by Howard Schwartz (San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1988)

Other folktales describe of how Lilith captured Jewish babies in the night and ate them, and how she led young girls and young husbands astray. Although Lilith was demonized by early Jewish culture as a symbol of promiscuity and disobedience, many modern Jewish feminists see Lilith as a positive figure, a model of woman as equal to man in the creation story. For further reference, please check out the pages I have listed below, or read the introduction to the collection of stories in Lilith's Cave (see above).

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Lilith in the Talmud

Talmud - Mas. Nidah 24b

 

Rab Judah citing Samuel ruled: If an abortion had the likeness of Lilith

 

26 its mother is unclean by reason of the birth, for it is a child, but it has wings. So it was also taught: R. Jose stated, It once happened at Simoni

 

27 that a woman aborted the likeness of Lilith, and when the case came up for a decision before the Sages they ruled that it was a child but that it also had wings. If an abortion had the likeness of a serpent, Hanina the son of R. Joshua's brother ruled: Its mother is unclean by reason of the birth. R. Joseph proceeded to report the ruling to R. Gamaliel when the latter sent word [to]

 

28 R. Joshua, Take charge of29 your nephew and come with him to me. As they were going, Hanina's

 

30 daughterin-law came out to meet R. Joshua.

 

31 Master, she said to him, what is your ruling where an abortion had the likeness of a serpent? Its mother, he replied, is clean. But, she retorted, was it not in your name that my mother-in-law told me that its mother was unclean? And, he asked her, on what ground? Since [she told him] its eye-ball is round like that of a human being. As a result of her statements R. Joshua recollected his ruling and sent the following message to R. Gamaliel: Hanina gave his ruling on my authority.

 

32 Abaye observed: From this incident it may be learnt that when a scholar gives a ruling he should also indicate his reason so that when he is ever reminded of it he would recollect it.

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Talmud - Mas. Shabbath 151b

 

R. Hanina said: One may not sleep in a house alone,14 and whoever sleeps in a house alone is seized by Lilith.15

 

(15) The night demon. V.J.E. art. Lilith,

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Talmud - Mas. Eiruvin 100b

 

But can that be right?35 seeing that R. Isaac b. Abdimi stated: Eve was cursed with ten curses, since it is written: Unto the woman He said, and I will greatly multiply,36 which refers to the two drops of blood, one being that of menstruation and the other that of virginity, thy pain36 refers to the pain of bringing up children, and thy travail36 refers to the pain of conceptions in pain thou shalt bring forth children36 is to be understood in its literal meaning, and thy desire shall be to thy husband36 teaches that a woman yearns for her husband when he is about to set out on a journey, and he shall rule over thee36 teaches that while the wife solicits with her heart the husband does so with his mouth, this being a fine trait of character among women?37 What was meant is38 that she ingratiates herself with him.39 But are not these40 only seven? When R. Dimi came41 he explained: She is wrapped up like a mourner,42 banished from the company of all men43 and confined within a prison.44

 

What is meant by banished from the company of all men? If it be suggested: That she is forbidden to meet a man in privacy, is not the man also but could be retorted.] forbidden to meet a woman in privacy? The meaning rather is that she is forbidden to marry two men. In a Baraitha it was taught: She grows long hair like Lilith, 45

 

sits when making water like a beast, and serves as a bolster for her husband. And the other?46 These, he holds, are rather complimentary to her, R. Hiyya having made the following statement: What is meant by the Scriptural text: Who teacheth us by47 the beasts of the earth and maketh us wise by48 the fowls of the heaven?49 Who teacheth us by the beasts refers to the mule which kneels when it makes water, and maketh us wise by the fowls of the heaven refers to the cock which first coaxes and then mates.

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Talmud - Mas. Gittin 69b

 

and let it drip on three stalks of carob and stir it with a piece of stem of marjoram; when the stem of marjoram is boiled it is all boiled enough. He can also take the excrement of a white dog and knead it with balsam, but if he can possibly avoid it he should not eat the dog's excrement as it loosens the limbs. For gira1

 

he should take an arrow of Lilith 2

 

and place it point upwards and pour water on it and drink it. Alternatively he can take water of which a dog has drunk at night, but he must take care that it has not been exposed.3

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Talmud - Mas. Baba Bathra 73a

 

Rabbah28

 

said: I saw how Hormin29

 

the son of Lilith 30

 

was running on the parapet31

 

of the wall of Mahuza, and a rider, galloping below on horseback32 could not overtake him. Once they saddled for him two mules which stood

 

(30) Lilith, a female night demon.

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Talmud - Mas. Nidah 24b

 

Rab Judah citing Samuel ruled: If an abortion had the likeness of Lilith 26

 

its mother is unclean by reason of the birth, for it is a child, but it has wings. So it was also taught: R. Jose stated, It once happened at Simoni27

 

that a woman aborted the likeness of Lilith, and when the case came up for a decision before the Sages they ruled that it was a child but that it also had wings. If an abortion had the likeness of a serpent, Hanina the son of R. Joshua's brother ruled: Its mother is unclean by reason of the birth. R. Joseph proceeded to report the ruling to R. Gamaliel when the latter sent word [to]28

 

R. Joshua, Take charge of29 your nephew and come with him to me. As they were going, Hanina's30 daughterin-law came out to meet R. Joshua.31 Master, she said to him, what is your ruling where an abortion had the likeness of a serpent? Its mother, he replied, is clean. But, she retorted, was it not in your name that my mother-in-law told me that its mother was unclean? And, he asked her, on what ground? Since [she told him] its eye-ball is round like that of a human being. As a result of her statements R. Joshua recollected his ruling and sent the following message to R. Gamaliel: Hanina gave his ruling on my authority.32 Abaye observed: From this incident it may be learnt that when a scholar gives a ruling he should also indicate his reason so that when he is ever reminded of it he would recollect it.

 

Be careful with false doctrines

 

Watchout for bad Concordances, bibles, and the Talmud

 

Shalom